Fly’s Friday Five: Hiring – Where Are All the People?

Written by: Gary Fly
Flys Friday Five

Today, I have had two conversations in the last hour with clients around their people shortages. Both of them happened to be in the manufacturing space, and they’re just struggling for talent, they can’t meet demand, they can’t get their schedules filled, and they’re running a lot of overtime. Where did all of the people go? If you have the answer to that, let me know, because I don’t think any of us really understand it.  

There are, however, some folks that have some good insights. I actually sat through a seminar with Chris Czarnik, and he had some interesting demographic information. Check him out online if you’re looking for some of those answers, but I want to talk a little bit about people, talent management and recruiting…  

As you may know, The Brooks Group is a sales training company. What you may not know is that our two largest clients use us for recruiter training. And we do a lot of work in that space. In fact, we are doing a series of workshops right now. I want to brag on the work that Michelle Richardson, VP of Sales Performance Research, did putting the workshops together and share a comment we just received from one of the recruiters: 

“This is the innovative training we need as it directly addresses the current challenges we’re facing in a rapidly changing recruiting environment.” 

I thought those were some nice accolades on what we’ve done.  

  1. The first idea I have for you, that really also comes from Chris Czarnik, is that we need to think about recruiting differently. I mentioned that we’re a sales training company. And in sales training, we talk about how to sell more things. Oftentimes in the recruiting world, we just run an ad and wait for inbound leads, wait for people to express interest. Chris has challenged his clients. And I think it makes a lot of sense to think about recruiting the same way you think about sales, right? In sales, we’re accustomed to competing for the customer. In recruiting, why don’t we take that same mindset, and think about how we position our recruiting organization so that we’re actually out there competitively looking for people.  
  2. Secondly, I think it’s more important than ever to screen employees or potential employees. I want to go back to another conversation I had with a manufacturing client. They said they’ve removed all screens because they were preventing the hires from making it through the process. In the same breath, they also talked about, they were regularly being ghosted by these new hires, the new hires are only working a day or two, or maybe not even a full shift. I would submit to you that the way to prevent that is to actually increase your screening and use good screening tools during the interview process. We believe in our tool, The Brooks Talent Index, so much that we use it ourselves. Our clients use it not only screening, but for coaching and professional development purposes.  
  3. Third idea is to have a great onboarding program. So many times people come to work, they’re excited, they really want to learn, they’ve told their family about their new job. And then the onboarding falls flat – it’s a series of paperwork and legal forms and that’s it. I think it’s important to have an intentional onboarding by upskilling the new person in a proactive way and introducing them to the organization in a way that builds alignment and excitement.  
  4. Fourth, is to ensure that your new hires have the proper tools and training to do their job. Whether that’s a well-performing laptop, tools for the factory floor, or whatever it is, they need to have the tools and training to do the job with confidence and to feel like they have a chance for success. So, that’s the fourth idea – ensuring that you’re able to attract, hire, and retain good people.  
  5. The fifth idea that I have for you, is that you need to treat your employees like adults. Give them respect, give them the dignity, give them the ability to think and use their own talents in the job in a way that, again, builds confidence. I think that will build loyalty to the team and to the organization.  

I would love to hear your comments. Always happy to debate or discuss these ideas with you. You know, my email is gfly@thebrooksgroup.com. Please reach out if you’d like to learn more! 

Written By

Gary Fly

Gary Fly is the President & CEO at The Brooks Group, where he brings 25+ years of senior management experience. In his role as President of The Brooks Group, Gary is applying his keen business insights and energetic management style while extending the success and legacy established by William T. Brooks and his sons, Jeb and Will, honed during the company’s rich, 40-plus-year legacy.
Written By

Gary Fly

Gary Fly is the President & CEO at The Brooks Group, where he brings 25+ years of senior management experience. In his role as President of The Brooks Group, Gary is applying his keen business insights and energetic management style while extending the success and legacy established by William T. Brooks and his sons, Jeb and Will, honed during the company’s rich, 40-plus-year legacy.

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