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The Power of Enthusiasm and Belief

Enthusiasm is critical for success in any endeavor. Whether it is to pick up the phone and make one more call after being rejected, recovering from a difficult illness, resurrecting a relationship, handling a disgruntled customer or anything else, enthusiasm is essential.

Each of us really do need to get excited about your job and your life. Then it's all about progress and achievement; but how do you get inspired to achieve some apparently overwhelming task?

I really believe that real winning enthusiasm comes from a combination of two deep inner convictions.

#1 Being Captivated by an Ideal

Here's the issue. Enthusiasm does not exist in the absence of a deep conviction that a task (whatever task it is) is worthy of your absolute best effort. It's the belief that something is worth living and even dying for that causes a person to lay it all on the line, to risk everything, and to suffer untold agony without even a complaint.

Do you want to see your career - and life - really take off? Commit yourself completely to the deepest urge within you and lose yourself in your deepest passion. Whatever that passion might be. Making a difference, moving a cause forward, gaining great recognition, achieving financial independence, etc. It may make little difference to anyone else what it is - as long as it is a positive and worthwhile dream for you.

#2 The Deep, Heartfelt Belief That You Can Achieve It

This belief building process is, perhaps, the most overlooked component of anyone's success pattern. It is also the most critical component behind sustained action. It's easy to start movement toward something. However, sustaining that positive movement or motion is quite another.

Do you, for example, really believe (I mean really) that you can accomplish a series of tasks that lead to a successful outcome? In his fabulous book, Man's Search for Meaning, Dr. Viktor Frankl made this point clear.

As a prisoner in a Nazi detention camp during World War II, he saw thousands of his fellow prisoners die from a full range of diseases and mistreatment while he, and a small number of others, survived. His premise was that those who survived had a greater reason to do so - plus they really, really believed that they would.

Compare your situation to his. I'll bet you have no prison guards who are trying to harm (or even kill) you, you can, likely, get 3 meals a day and have hope for the future.

It's really simple:

      1. Be enthusiastic.
      2. Believe you can accomplish those things you're most enthusiastic about.

    Submitted by: bill
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